#15 Life on Land – The Emperors Nightingale

The Emperors Nightingale, a fairytale from H.-C. Andersen is a strong reminder for mankind, that biodiversity and life on Planet Earth is fragile and needs to be protected!

Externally due to their reddish-brown plumage, rather inconspicuous, has the 16 to 17 centimeters large nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos), however, a very distinctive voice, which is also their namesake. Their food consists mainly of insects and their larvae as well as earthworms and spiders. In late summer it also eats berries and juicy fruits. 120 to 260 different types of stanzas dominate the male nightingale, which tunes their singing mainly at night, during the breeding season for territorial defense during the day.

With her beautiful singing, the nightingale was the source of inspiration for famous composers such as Chopin and Beethoven or playwrights and storytellers such as Shakespeare and H.C. Andersen. Nowadays, the nightingale is often only known to most people due to popular songs. This is because our living environment offers fewer and fewer breeding opportunities for the ground-nesting bird, which relies on dense undergrowth and a protective fall-leaf layer.

The nightingale prefers habitats such as light deciduous and alluvial forests, parks, cemeteries and hedgerows. In Germany, there are still about 95,000 breeding pairs of the nightingale, which hibernate in tropical Africa, north of the equator. But dangers lurk on the way there. Because in Cyprus and northern Egypt, bird traps often seal their fate. A lucrative business, the songbirds are considered a delicacy in Egyptian markets. Each year, about 140 million migratory birds die.

PROTECT SINGING BIRDS BY SECURING RICH ECOSYSTEMS AT HOME AND BY STOPPING THE ILLEGAL BIRDTRAPS

With the nature fairy tale The Emperor’s Nightingale, the children of the fourth grade of the elementary school Otto Boye from Haldensleben, the YOUNG VOICES for SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, campaign for more environmental awareness to protect their native habitats and especially for the protection of nightingales and other migratory birds on their way to the South during wintertime.

The Emperor’s Nightingale is part of the environmental fairytale campaign Nawa & Bubo powered by Explority. To learn more about this program click here

#15 Life on Land – The Queen Bee

The meadow orchard with apple, pear and plum trees at the castle of Hundisburg is being powdered by the castle bees. But also the wasps find enough food here..

Unlike the bees, who build a kingdom and have a queen, most of the wild bee species live as individuals. The females build nests and take care of the nest boxes without help of others of their own kind. Only bumblebees and a few selected wild bees carry a social life similar to the honey bee.

Wild bees secure their nutrition exclusively by nectar and pollen. its challenge is the big dependance of specific nesting and food places and their low growth rate in population.

Especially the intensification in agricultural production is leading to a dramatic loss of ecosystems rich in structure like bushes, deadwood or heaps of stones and a reduction of blossoming plants

It is in our sustainable interest that a large biodiversity especially within the bee population is providing healthy habitats.

HELP PROTECT DIVERSE ECOSYSTEMS AND THE EXISTENCE OF WILD BEES

With the natural fairy tale Die Bienenkönigin (The Queen Bee), the children of the 5th grade of the Brothers Grimm School from Calvörde, the YOUNG VOICES for SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, campaign for more environmental awareness and especially for the protection of wild bees. Die Bienenkönigin is part of the environmental fairytale campaign Nawa & Bubo powered by Explority. To learn more about this program click here

#6 Clean Water in Germany and Uganda – the Film

Young Voices from the Ringelnatz School in Berlin, Germany and the Rainbow House of Hope in Kampala, Uganda exchange on the importance of clean water and access to water and the question of how to reduce water usage.

Access to Water is a human right, which needs to be protected!

Join us!

 

 

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#4 #6 Serious gaming for the SDG’s – digital and analog

YOUNG VOICES today come from class 5a of Ringelnatz school in Berlin where the kids had a unique opportunity when they got to play a serious game in their computer room as well as replaying it in their class room in an analog way!

Babu and Mirembe is a digital, intercultural learning game, which introduces life realities from kids in Kampala, Uganda and their challenges to go to school. In Uganda, a child is only eligible to go to school, if it can afford to buy a school uniform! Goal of this game is to help a Ugandan child to sell water in an urban environment in order to earn money to be able to buy a school uniform and thus being able to go to school!

You, as the player, can speed up the process, if you know the answers to quiz questions along the way, collecting bonus points which help to buy the uniform earlier.

The game reflects on the problems for natives to have access to clean water (SDG #6) as well as the challenge of gaining access to quality education only by buying a school uniform which overburdens families with low or no income, excluding their children from access to education (SDG #4)

Babu and Mirembe was developed during a project by Radijojo e.V. with 5th graders in Berlin Germany with the support of the visiting director of the Rainbow House of Hope in Kampala, Uganda, who gave valuable insights in the daily lives and challenges of children in the capitol of the subsaharan country.

The next day the same students who played Babu and Mirembe on a desktop now developed a way to recreate the game scenario in their own classroom, in an analog way!

First, the students drew a plan of how to set up a game city in their own classroom. Then organizing streets, buildings and game activity stations…

…such as the water station, where the player buys water which he sells to other people (represented by students) in the city. Money to buy school uniforms could also be earned at a… 

… construction site. Child labour is unfortunately still common in many African countries. Here the students at Ringelnatz school had to stack ten chairs and thus  learned, how heavy physical labour can be…

At a quiz station, the students had to answer water related question (SDG #6). With the (“selfmade”) money earned…

…the students could finally spend their Ugandan Schillings to buy a uniform at the school uniform shop

The analog version of the game added an even more dramatic, immediate and intense level to the game experience. The students felt the pressure and the spirit of achieving the goal. The students reaction was highly positive referring to the engaging methodology and the intercultural context of their global learning experience.

To play a German version of the game yourself follow this link

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and

Special thanks to the students from class 5a, the principal as well as the class teacher of the Ringelnatz Schule in Berlin, Germany.

#6: CLEAN WATER: Traces of water at Ringelnatz school in Berlin

 

Hello! We are the kids from the class 5a at the Ringelnatz school in Berlin. We are learning about the sustainable development goals and especially goal 6: the importance of clean water. We were asking ourselves about where to find water at our school, so we took a little photo tour at our school. Check out what we found!

 

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#16 Peace – is communication

When talking about Peace, understanding each other is the foundation. We are the kids from class 6a at the Andersen school in Berlin.

We discussed how important it is to feel safe, to have friends, to be able to play, to be able to learn. And we learned about different cultures in the world and that being nice could also mean being not so nice in a different culture… so we played a little game, where we all slipped into a cultural role, into somebody else, acting very different from what we normally are. Each culture uses different codes for communication, for greeting each other. We discussed different photos for intercultural situations and checked our awareness for small details.

We learned that it is important to respect each other regardless of our cultural background in order to become friends.

Check out our drawings, poems and photos from our project.

We send our best wishes to our peers in Benin, Africa! Have a great New Year 2018!

 

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To lead with your eyes – We learn the language of horses

Eyes say more than words!  Animals deserve our respect and protection.

This short video was taken during a horse based communication training for kids. While visiting them in their natural habitat, we learned about the natural being of horses, their tremendous perception and the “horse sense”. We got into direct contact with them and practiced leadership exercises using no force at all.

#16 Strong Institutions – Explority visits the school parliament of Bettina von Arnim School

Foto/Graphic by Martin Küchler

At the Educational Centre “Wannsee Forum” in Berlin, Germany, student members of the school parliament of the Bettina von Arnim school (BvA) are meeting for an intensive retreat on political education. Explority is part of the program, discussing the Sustainable Development Goals with a focus and goal 16: strong institutions.

The program includes a live contact via Internet to Sierra Leone, where the students learn about challenges for the youth and student participation in the Global South. They discuss their own role and opportunities for democratic participation in the German educational system and their individual responsibility for more global fairness.

Part of the program is furthermore media education which will be used for campaigning own rights and interests in the context of empowering the youth for sustainable development. Also the students get involved in using serious games as a method for transporting knowledge in regards of the SDG’s. Tune in here for further messages and results of the students from the BvA!

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